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Accurate aneuploidy screening

NexCCS, available exclusively from the Foundation for Embryonic Competence (FEC), counts all 23 pairs of chromosomes in an embryo to determine which embryos have the greatest potential to become a healthy pregnancy and baby.


Testing for too many or too few chromosomes

Embryos with the usual number of chromosomes, also called euploid embryos, have a greater chance of becoming a healthy pregnancy and baby. Euploid embryos have 46 chromosomes and are created when a sperm with 23 chromosomes fertilizes an egg with 23 chromosomes. Sometimes embryos are created that do not have the usual number of chromosomes. These embryos, also called aneuploid embryos, are more likely to result in in vitro fertilization (IVF) failure. Aneuploidy also contributes to miscarriage and can be associated with health problems during pregnancy or following delivery. One of the most common examples of aneuploidy is trisomy 21, also referred to as Down syndrome, which is caused by the presence of a third copy of chromosome 21.

 

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NexCCS helps you minimize your risk of miscarriage and increase your chances of a healthy pregnancy and baby by screening your embryos for the usual number of chromosomes before IVF transfer.

NexCCS helps you minimize your risk of miscarriage and increase your chances of a healthy pregnancy and baby.

Before the development of aneuploidy screening, selecting embryos for IVF transfer was based largely on how an embryo looked; however, we now know that there is little connection between how an embryo appears on the outside and the number of chromosomes present within each of the cells.

NexCCS is a well-validated method of comprehensive chromosome screening that uses next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to determine the number of chromosomes in an embryo biopsy sample. In addition to looking for extra or missing whole chromosomes, NexCCS has the ability to detect some cases of segmental aneuploidy (extra or missing pieces of chromosome material) and mosaicism (a combination of euploid and aneuploid cells in a single embryo).

While the clinical significance of both segmental aneuploidy and mosaicism can vary, these findings increase the risk for implantation failure, miscarriage, and poor outcome.

See the following steps regarding the NexCCS process:

step-3

Step 1

Perform trophectoderm biopsy

step-1

Step 2

FEC receives embryo biopsy

step-5

Step 3

FEC analyzes biopsy

step-6

Step 4

Results made available to your clinical team

 

Talk with your doctor or genetic counselor to determine if NexCCS is right for you.

 

Download NexCCS Brochure

Advanced detection of aneuploidy for increased success in IVF

NexCCS has been developed following extensive clinical trials and combines the advantage of targeted amplification for aneuploidy screening and Ion Torrent—based NGS. NexCCS counts all 23 pairs of chromosomes at the molecular level for a comprehensive approach.

The only fully validated platform for aneuploidy screening performed on trophectoderm biopsy, NexCCS:

  • Has greater than 98% accuracy in screening for whole chromosome aneuploidy1
  • Has the ability to detect some cases of segmental aneuploidy and mosaicism
  • Is proven to have lower false positive rates compared to aCGH

The NexCCS process

The FEC is committed to working with your practice to provide NexCCS for your patients.

Greater than 98% accuracy in screening for whole chromosome aneuploidy.1

Our laboratory team will work closely with your practice to coordinate the sending and receiving of biopsy material. Once biopsies are received in our laboratory, the samples are run on our NGS platform and analyzed using sophisticated bioinformatics algorithms to precisely determine each embryo’s molecular karyotype.

You will receive an in-depth report that will enable you to select euploid embryos for transfer to your patients. Reports are typically generated in 5 to 7 days and are released directly to your institution upon completion.

Trophectoderm biopsy is mandatory for NexCCS as cleavage stage biopsy has been shown to impair the reproductive potential of an embryo by nearly 40%.2

The FEC is proud to provide embryology training and validation on trophectoderm biopsies prior to your clinic sending any samples to the FEC. Please contact the FEC for more information about this best-in-class service.

See the following steps regarding the NexCCS process:

step-3

Step 1

Perform trophectoderm biopsy

step-1

Step 2

FEC receives embryo biopsy

step-5

Step 3

FEC analyzes biopsy

step-6

Step 4

Results made available to your clinical team

 


References: 1. Forman EJ, Upham KM, Cheng M, et al. Comprehensive chromosome screening alters traditional morphology-based embryo selection: a prospective study of 100 consecutive cycles of planned fresh euploid blastocyst transfer. Fertil Steril. 2013;100(3):718-724. 2. Data on file. The Foundation for Embryonic Competence. 2016.